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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of supplementary feeding on body weight of breeding northern wheatears Oenanthe oenanthe on the island of Öland, Kalmar, Sweden

Published source details

Moreno J. (1989) Body-mass variation in breeding northern wheatears: a field experiment with supplementary food. The Condor, 91, 178-186


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary food for birds or mammals Farmland Conservation

A replicated and controlled study in the breeding seasons of 1985-1987 in grasslands on Öland, southern Sweden (Moreno 1989), found that female northern wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe, but not males, that were provided with supplementary food were significantly heavier than unfed controls (average of 26.9 g for 53 fed females and 24.4 g for 42 fed males vs 24.3 g and 23.7 g for 48 and 32 unfed controls). However, there was no effect when females were feeding older chicks, which were able to regulate their body temperature. A few days after hatching, most food was delivered to chicks, not consumed by adults. Food consisted of 7 g of mealworms provided either during incubation, or for the entire breeding season.

 

Provide supplementary food for songbirds to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A replicated and controlled study in the breeding seasons of 1985-7 in grasslands on Öland, southern Sweden (Moreno 1989), found that female northern wheatears Oenanthe oenanthe, but not males, that were provided with supplementary food were significantly heavier than unfed controls (average of 26.9 g for 53 fed females and 24.4 g for 42 fed males vs. 24.3 g and 23.7 g for 48 and 32 unfed controls). However, there was no effect when females were feeding older chicks, (after they were able to regulate their body temperature. A few days after hatching, most food was delivered to chicks, not consumed by adults. Food consisted of 7 g of mealworms provided either during incubation, or for the entire breeding season.