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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of unsprayed headlands on chick survival of grey partridge Perdix perdix, red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa and ring-necked pheasant Phasianus colchicus in arable farmland in north-eastern Hampshire and East Anglia, southern and eastern England

Published source details

Rands M.R.W. (1986) The survival of gamebird (Galliformes) chicks in relation to pesticide use on cereals. Ibis, 128, 57-64


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands) Farmland Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1984 on the same farm in Hampshire as in (Rands 1985) and on eight sites in East Anglia, UK (Rands 1986), found that grey partridge Perdix perdix broods had significantly higher survival, and were significantly larger on plots with conservation headlands, compared to control plots with conventionally-sprayed headlands (average of 75% survival and 7.8-10.0 chicks/brood for five broods on conservation headland plots vs 60% and 4.7-7.5 chicks/brood for four broods on conventional plots, 196 broods surveyed). This paper also describes similar, although less conclusive effects on two non-native gamebirds (red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa and ring-necked pheasant Phasianus colchicus). This study was part of the same experimental set-up as (Rands et al. 1984, Rands 1985, Rands & Sotherton 1986, Dover et al. 1990, Sotherton 1991, Dover 1997).

Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands) Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1984 on the same farm as in (Rands et al. 1984, Rands 1985) and on eight sites in East Anglia, England (Rands 1986), found that grey partridge Perdix perdix broods had significantly higher survival, and were significantly larger on plots with conservation headlands, compared to control plots with conventionally-sprayed headlands (average of 75% survival and 7.8-10.0 chicks/brood for five broods on conservation headland plots vs. 60% and 4.7-7.5 chicks/brood for four broods on conventional plots; 196 broods surveyed). This paper also describes similar, although less conclusive effects on two non-native gamebirds.