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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Restoration of wet features for breeding lapwing Vanellus vanellus on lowland grassland within the Broads Environmentally Sensitive Area, Norfolk and Suffolk, England

Published source details

Eglington S.M., Gill J.A., Bolton M., Smart M.A., Sutherland W.J. & Watkinson A.R. (2008) Restoration of wet features for breeding waders on lowland grassland. Journal of Applied Ecology, 45, 305-314


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Raise water levels in ditches or grassland Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 2005-2006 on 70 fields with wet features at nine lowland pastoral sites in east England (Eglington et al. 2008) found that the probability of a field being used by nesting lapwing was significantly higher with an increase in footdrain floods.  Fields with footdrain floods held the highest densities of nesting pairs. Nests were more likely to be located within 50 m of footdrain floods and chicks more likely to forage near footdrain floods (in wet mud patches created by receding water). Fields with footdrains, footdrain floods and isolated pools were visited at least once a week (March-July 2005-2006) and the number of lapwing pairs displaying parental behaviour within a 10-min sampling period used as a measure of brood density.

 

Raise water levels in ditches or grassland Farmland Conservation

A replicated study in 2005-2006 of 70 fields with wet features at nine lowland pastoral sites in eastern England (Eglington et al. 2008) found that the probability of a field being used by nesting northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus was significantly greater with an increase of foot drain floods.  Foot drains are shallow channels used historically for drainage. Foot drain floods are areas where water overtops the foot drain. Fields with foot drain floods held the highest densities of nesting pairs. Nests were more likely to be located within 50 m of foot drain floods and chicks more likely to forage near foot drain floods (in wet mud patches created by receding water). Fields with foot drains, foot drain floods and isolated pools were visited at least once a week (March-July 2005-2006) and the number of lapwing pairs displaying parental behaviour within a 10-min sampling period used as a measure of brood density.  Habitat variables and percentage of wet ground were collected around each nest site and the distance measured to the nearest foot drain, pool and flood.