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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Survival of captive-reared Puerto Rican parrots Amazona vittata released in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico

Published source details

White T.H. Jr., Collazo J.A. & Vilella F.J. (2005) Survival of captive-reared Puerto Rican parrots released in the Caribbean National Forest. The Condor, 107, 424-432


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of parrots Bird Conservation

A replicated study of the release of 34 captive-bred Puerto Rican parrots Amazona vittata in a subtropical rainforest in northeast Puerto Rico, in 2000-2 (White et al. 2005), found that first-year survival was estimated at 41% (ten confirmed alive, 13 confirmed dead and 11 unaccounted for). Three released and one wild bird attempted to breed in 2004: one attempt (by a pair of birds released in 2002) failed, but the other (with a male released in 2001 and a wild female) successfully fledged two chicks. Seven mortalities (54%) were due to avian predation. Birds were held for four months in large aviaries close to the release site before being moved to acclimatisation cages at the release site one month before release. Birds were given flight and predator aversion training.