Study

Wintering cirl buntings Emberiza cirlus selected stubbles of cereal crops grown with reduced pesticide inputs in south Devon, England

  • Published source details Bradbury R.B., Bailey C.M., Wright D. & Evans A.D. (2008) Wintering cirl buntings Emberiza cirlus in southwest England select cereal stubbles that follow a low-input herbicide regime. Bird Study, 55, 23-31

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Reduce pesticide or herbicide use generally

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Reduce fertilizer, pesticide or herbicide use generally

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Reduce pesticide or herbicide use generally

    A replicated site comparison on 186 overwinter stubble fields in Devon, England (Bradbury et al. 2008), found that cirl buntings Emberiza cirlus, foraged at significantly higher densities on stubble fields under a ‘Special Project’ agri-environment option, compared to stubbles under standard agri-environment schemes (approximately 0.45 birds/ha for 102 special project stubble fields vs. 0.05 birds/ha for 52 conventional wheat stubbles and 0.15 birds/ha for 32 conventional barley stubbles). The special project stubbles were also preferentially selected to some extent by four other species of songbird. The special project was designed to encourage cirl buntings and allowed the use of fungicides, growth regulators and specified herbicides to control grass weeds, but prohibited the use of insecticides and herbicides to control broad-leaved weeds.

     

  2. Reduce fertilizer, pesticide or herbicide use generally

    A replicated site comparison on 186 overwinter stubble fields in Devon, England (Bradbury et al. 2008) found that cirl bunting Emberiza cirlus, foraged at significantly higher densities on stubble fields under a ‘Special Project’ agri-environment option, compared to stubbles under standard agri-environment schemes with a conventional pesticide regime (approximately 0.45 birds/ha for 102 special project stubble fields vs 0.05 birds/ha for 52 conventional wheat stubbles and 0.15 birds/ha for 32 conventional barley stubbles). The special project stubbles were also preferentially selected to some extent by four other species of songbird. The special project was designed to encourage cirl buntings and allowed the use of fungicides, growth regulators and specified herbicides to control grass weeds, but prohibited the use of insecticides and herbicides to control broadleaved weeds.

     

Output references

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