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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of old nest material in nest boxes on reproductive successs of tree swallows Tachycineta bicolor at Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area, British Columbia, Canada

Published source details

Rendell W. & Verbeek N. (1996) Old nest material in nestboxes of tree swallows: effects on reproductive success. The Condor, 98, 142-152


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Clean nest boxes to increase occupancy or reproductive success Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in marshland in 1991-2 in British Columbia, Canada (Rendell & Verbeek 1996), found that tree swallow Tachycineta bicolor reproductive success was not affected by removing old nesting material from nest boxes, removing nesting material and adding a raised ‘floor’ to simulate old nesting material or microwaving old nesting material. In 1992, cleaned birds using cleaned boxes laid and hatched eggs significantly earlier than those using other nest types (first eggs laid on 15th May and hatched on the 2nd June for 37 cleaned boxes vs. 18-20th May and 4-6th June for 68 others). Bird fleas Certaophyllys idius were more numerous in boxes with old nesting material. Use of boxes is discussed in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for songbirds Bird Conservation

A replicated study in marshland in 1991-2 in British Columbia, Canada (Rendell & Verbeek 1996), found that tree swallows Tachycineta bicolor occupied 90-100% of 125 nest boxes provided. The effect of cleaning boxes is described in ‘Clean nest boxes to increase occupancy or reproductive success’.