Study

Successful translocation of the threatened clouded Apollo butterfly (Parnassius mnemosyne) and metapopulation establishment in southern Finland

  • Published source details Kuussaari M., Heikkinen R.K., Heliölä J., Luoto M., Mayer M., Rytteri S. & von Bagh P. (2015) Successful translocation of the threatened clouded Apollo butterfly (Parnassius mnemosyne) and metapopulation establishment in southern Finland. Biological Conservation, 190, 51-59.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate to re-establish populations in known or believed former range

Action Link
Butterfly and Moth Conservation
  1. Translocate to re-establish populations in known or believed former range

    A replicated study in 2000–2013 in two semi-natural grasslands in Uusimaa district, Finland (Kuussaari et al. 2015) reported that one of two translocated populations of clouded Apollo Parnassius mnemosyne increased in abundance and colonized new habitat. Results were not tested for statistical significance. From 11–13 years after the release of 20 mated females, the population at one release site was estimated to be 250–650 butterflies, and all 11 suitable habitat patches within 2 km had been colonized and were estimated to have an additional 451 butterflies in 2013. At the other site, no clouded Apollos were seen in the first summer after translocation, or in later years. The authors suggested that the higher abundance of host plants and surrounding forest cover enclosing the successful site may have been important (see paper for details). In June 2000, forty mated female butterflies were caught from four areas in a large population, stored in a cool box, and translocated to two unoccupied sites 25 km apart, and 105 and 130 km from the nearest known populations. Half of the butterflies were translocated on each of two days, one week apart, during the peak flight season. From 2000–2001, both sites were visited several times to monitor survival. From 2001–2003, the successful site was monitored for 5–6 days/year. From 2004–2013, all 11 suitable habitat patches within 2 km of the release site were also monitored on 7–24 days/year.

    (Summarised by: Andrew Bladon)

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