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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effect of different hedgerow management upon hawthorn Crataegus monogyna berry yield, Monks Wood, Cambridgeshire, England

Published source details

Sparks T.H. & Martin T. (1999) Yields of hawthorn Crataegus monogyna berries under different hedgerow management. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 72, 107-110


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manage hedgerows to benefit wildlife (includes no spray, gap-filling and laying) Farmland Conservation

A replicated study of hedgerows in Cambridgeshire, UK (Sparks & Martin 1999) found that hawthorn Crataegus monogyna berry yield was significantly higher in unmanaged hedgerows than those that were laid (and trimmed after 5 years) or coppiced (and trimmed after 5 years) or pollarded to 1.5 m. Yield decreased with more extreme management treatments (unmanaged: 148-161 g/2.5 m²; laid: 48-85 g/2.5 m²; coppiced: 3 g/2.5 m²; pollarded: 2 g/2.5 m²). There was some compensation for reduced hawthorn yields in laid and coppiced hedgerows through increased rose hip yields, although rose hip samples were too small for analysis. There were no significant differences between laid (84 g/2.5 m²) and laid and trimmed hedgerows (86 g/2.5 m²); the two hedgerow treatments were visually difficult to separate. The weights of 50 berries were lighter in coppiced plots (11 g) than all other treatments (15-16 g). There were no significant differences in berry dry matter content between treatments (45-51%). Hawthorn and rose Rosa canina agg. berries were harvested from three to eight replicates in October 1997. Hedgerows were laid or coppiced in 1990-1991 and were trimmed or pollarded in 1995-1996. Berries were harvested within each plot (20-40m long sections) from five 50 × 50 cm quadrats on the side of hedges, 1m above ground.