Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Caspian terns Sterna caspia breed successfully on a nesting raft in Toronto Outer Harbour, Lake Ontario, Ontario, Canada

Published source details

Lampman K., Taylor M. & Blokpoel H. (1996) Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) breed successfully on a nesting raft. Colonial Waterbirds, 19, 135-138


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide artificial nesting sites for ground and tree-nesting seabirds Bird Conservation

A small trial in 1993-5 in western Lake Ontario, Canada (Lampman et al. 1996), found that the number of Caspian terns Sterna caspia nesting on an artificial raft increased from one pair in 1993 (raising two chicks) to 50 pairs (raising 97 chicks) in 1995. In 1995 the raft produced the majority of young in the area, due to heavy predation on mainland nests by red foxes Vulpes vulpes. The raft was 3.6 x 9.8 m, covered in sand and gravel, was anchored adjacent to a mainland subcolony and covered with a tarpaulin between April and May to discourage ring-billed gulls Larus delawarensis from nesting. Eight tern decoys were also placed on the raft (discussed in ‘Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas’), a sound system played vocalisations from a Caspian tern colony in 1993 (see ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’) and in 1995, eight chick shelters were added to the raft.

 

Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A small trial in 1993-4 at the western end of Lake Ontario, Canada (Lampman et al. 1996), found that the number of Caspian terns Sterna caspia nesting on an artificial raft increased from one pair in 1993 to six pairs in 1994. A speaker system played vocalisations from a Caspian tern colony for four hours a day as terns arrived in the area each year. The study is discussed in detail in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.

 

Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A small trial in 1993-5 at the western end of Lake Ontario, Canada (Lampman et al. 1996), found that the number of Caspian terns Sterna caspia nesting on an artificial raft with eight tern decoys on increased from one pair in 1993 to 50 pairs in 1995. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.