Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Provision of nesting rafts for a declining common tern Sterna hirundo colony at Eastern Headland, Toronto Outer Harbour, Ontario, Canada

Published source details

Dunlop C.L., Blokpoel H. & Jarvie S. (1991) Nesting rafts as a management tool for a declining common tern (Sterna hirundo) colony. Colonial Waterbirds, 14, 116-120


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide artificial nesting sites for ground and tree-nesting seabirds Bird Conservation

A replicated trial in 1990 at Lake Ontario, Canada (Dunlop et al. 1991), found that common terns Sterna hirundo successfully nested on four floating wooden rafts the same season that they were installed, with at least 170 fledglings being produced (average of 1.3 fledglings/nest). Terns successfully defended the rafts from Canada geese Branta canadensis and ring-billed gulls Larus delawarensis and used all four rafts. Rafts were 5 x 5 m, covered with sand and gravel and each had six decoy terns on (see ‘Attract birds to safe areas using decoys’ for more studies on decoys).

 

Use decoys to attract birds to safe areas Bird Conservation

A replicated trial in 1990 at Lake Ontario, Canada (Dunlop et al. 1991), found that common terns Sterna hirundo successfully used four floating wooden rafts, each with six tern decoys on, the same season that they were installed. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.