Study

Recovery of the Galapagos rail Laterallus spilonotus following the removal of invasive mammals on Santiago, Fernandina and Isabela Islands, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

  • Published source details Donlan C.J., Campbell K., Cabrera W., Lavoie C., Carrion V. & Cruz F. (2007) Recovery of the Galapagos rail (Laterallus spilonotus) following the removal of invasive mammals. Biological Conservation, 138, 520-524

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Control mammalian predators on islands for rails

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Control or remove habitat-altering mammals

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Control mammalian predators on islands for rails

    A controlled before-and-after study on Santiago Island (585 km2), Galapagos, Ecuador (Donlan et al. 2007) found that densities of Galapagos rails Laterallus spilonotus increased following the eradication of feral mammals between 1998 and 2006 (279 rails found at 8.5-17.9 rails/ha in 2004-5 vs. 18 rails at 0-1.4 rails/ha in 1986-7). Over the same period, there was a smaller increase in rails detected on Ferdandina Island, which has remained free from invasive mammals (no rails detected during surveys in 1986-7 although some were heard outside survey times, 11 rails detected in 2004-5) and a decrease on Isabella Island, which retains feral goats, pigs and donkeys (13 rails in 247 survey plots at eight sites in 2004-5 vs. 24 rails in 60 survey plots in 1986-7). Donkeys Equus asinus, 17,000 pigs Sus scrofa and 70,000 goats Capra hircus were removed.

     

  2. Control or remove habitat-altering mammals

    A controlled before-and-after study on Santiago Island (585 km2), Galapagos, Ecuador (Donlan et al. 2007) found that densities of Galapagos rails Laterallus spilonotus increased following the eradication of feral mammals (including habitat-altering species) between 1998 and 2006. This study is discussed in ‘Control mammalian predators on islands’.

     

Output references

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