Study

Impacts of invasive house mice on post-release survival of translocated lizards

  • Published source details Norbury G., Van Den Munckhof M., Neitzel S., Hutcheon A., Reardon J. & Ludwig K. (2014) Impacts of invasive house mice on post-release survival of translocated lizards. New Zealand Journal of Ecology, 38, 322-327.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Remove or control predators using fencing and/or aerial nets

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Snakes & lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Remove or control predators using lethal controls: Snakes & lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Remove or control predators using fencing and/or aerial nets

    A study in 2009–2012 in an area of mixed shrub and grassland in Otago, New Zealand (Norbury et al. 2014) found that survival of captive-bred Otago skinks Oligosoma otagense released into an enclosure was higher for those released when house mice Mus musculus had been eradicated compared to when skinks were released in the presence of mice. Authors reported that post-release survival was higher for skinks released with no mice present (44%) compared to survival of skinks released just prior to reinvasion by mice (15%; see paper for details). Survival of established skinks (2 years after their release) after the mouse reinvasion was higher (91%) than for newly released skinks in the presence of mice (17%). In 2009, a 0.3 ha area was enclosed within a mammal resistant fence (1.9 m high) and over a six month period, all mammals inside the enclosure were eradicated using a range of baited traps. After eradication, 12 captive-bred adult skinks were released in the enclosure following eight weeks in quarantine. In 2011, an additional 16 skinks were quarantined and released. House mice reinvaded during 2012 and were again eradicated using live capture traps and poison bait stations. In 2009–2012, starting 7–10 days after release, skinks were monitored every 15 days by a walking survey of the enclosure.

    (Summarised by: William Morgan)

  2. Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Snakes & lizards

    A study in 2009–2012 in an area of mixed shrub and grassland in Otago, New Zealand (Norbury et al. 2014) found that survival of captive-bred Otago skinks Oligosoma otagense released into an enclosure was higher for those released when house mice Mus musculus had been eradicated compared to when skinks were released in the presence of mice. Authors reported that post-release survival was higher for skinks released with no mice present (44%) compared to survival of skinks released just prior to reinvasion by mice (15%; see paper for details). Survival of established skinks (2 years after their release) after the mouse reinvasion was higher (91%) than for newly released skinks in the presence of mice (17%). In 2009, a 0.3 ha area was enclosed within a mammal resistant fence (1.9 m high), and 12 captive-bred adult skinks were released in the enclosure following eight weeks in quarantine. In 2011, an additional 16 skinks were quarantined and released. Over a six-month period prior to the release, all mammals inside the enclosure were eradicated using a range of baited traps. House mice reinvaded during 2012 and were again eradicated using live capture traps and poison bait stations. In 2009–2012, starting 7–10 days after release, skinks were monitored every 15 days by a walking survey of the enclosure.

    (Summarised by: William Morgan)

  3. Remove or control predators using lethal controls: Snakes & lizards

    A study in 2009–2012 in an area of mixed shrub and grassland in Otago, New Zealand (Norbury et al. 2014) found that survival of captive-bred Otago skinks Oligosoma otagense released into an enclosure was higher for those released when house mice Mus musculus had been eradicated compared to when skinks were released in the presence of mice. Authors reported that post-release survival was higher for skinks released with no mice present (44%) compared to survival of skinks released just prior to reinvasion by mice (15%). Survival of established skinks (2 years after their release) after the mouse reinvasion was higher (91%) than for newly released skinks in the presence of mice (17%). In 2009, a 0.3 ha area was enclosed within a mammal resistant fence (1.9 m high) and over a six-month period, all mammals inside the enclosure were eradicated using a range of baited traps. After eradication, 12 captive-bred adult skinks were released in the enclosure following eight weeks in quarantine. In 2011, an additional 16 skinks were quarantined and released. House mice reinvaded during 2012 and were again eradicated using live capture traps and poison bait stations. In 2009–2012, starting 7–10 days after release, skinks were monitored every 15 days by a walking survey of the enclosure.

    (Summarised by: William Morgan)

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