Study

Increasing the chance of successful translocation of a threatened lizard

  • Published source details McCoy E.D., Osman N., Hauch B., Emerick A. & Mushinsky H.R. (2014) Increasing the chance of successful translocation of a threatened lizard. Animal Conservation, 17, 56-64.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use holding pens or enclosures at release site prior to release of wild reptiles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Translocate reptiles away from threats: Snakes and lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Use holding pens or enclosures at release site prior to release of wild reptiles

    A replicated study in 2008–2010 in dry scrubland in Florida, USA (McCoy et al. 2014) found that populations of Florida sand skinks Plestiodon reynoldsi translocated away from a proposed mining site and released into enclosures with different habitat features (trees, shade, woody debris) survived at least three years. Estimates of overall survival of translocated skinks ranged from 49–79%, and 105 of 300 skinks were recaptured during the two years following release. Provision of shade may have been important in explaining skink survival (reported as model result but effect size not reported). Newborn skinks (19 in 2008, 13 in 2009) were captured in all enclosure types. A further 35 newborns were trapped in 2010 (unpublished data). Skinks were sourced in spring 2007 from a site scheduled for sand mining and released in to fifteen 20 m2 enclosures (20 lizards/enclosure). Enclosures had five experimental treatments (tree only, shade cloth only, tree and coarse woody debris added, coarse woody debris only, control with no shade or debris). Skinks were trapped in enclosures in spring 2008–2009 (16 drift fences and 76 bucket-traps/enclosure), and further trapping was carried out in 2010 (method not given).

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

  2. Translocate reptiles away from threats: Snakes and lizards

    A replicated study in 2008–2010 in dry scrubland in Florida, USA (McCoy et al 2014) found that populations of Florida sand skinks Plestiodon reynoldsi translocated away from a proposed mining site and released into enclosures survived at least three years. Estimates of overall survival of translocated skinks ranged from 49–79%, and 105 of 300 (35%) skinks were recaptured during the two years following release into the enclosures. Provision of shade may have been important in explaining skink survival (reported as model result). Newborn skinks (19 in 2008, 13 in 2009) were captured in all enclosures. A further 35 newborns were trapped in 2010 (unpublished data). Skinks were sourced in spring 2007 from a site scheduled for sand mining and released into fifteen 20 m2 enclosures (20 lizards/enclosure). Enclosures had five experimental treatments (tree only, shade cloth only, tree and coarse woody debris added, coarse woody debris only, control with no shade or debris). Skinks were trapped in enclosures in spring 2008–2009 (16 drift fences and 76 bucket-traps/enclosure), and further trapping was carried out in 2010 (method not given).

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

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