Study

Penning prior to release decreases post‐translocation dispersal of jewelled geckos

  • Published source details Knox C.D. & Monks J.M. (2014) Penning prior to release decreases post‐translocation dispersal of jewelled geckos. Animal Conservation, 17, 18-26.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use holding pens or enclosures at release site prior to release of wild reptiles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Translocate reptiles away from threats: Snakes and lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Use holding pens or enclosures at release site prior to release of wild reptiles

    A replicated, controlled study in 2011–2012 in the Orokonui Valley, New Zealand (Knox & Monks 2014) found that keeping translocated jewelled geckos Naultinus gemmeus in a holding pen for up to ten months prior to release resulted in less movement away from their release site compared to unpenned geckos. None of the penned geckos (10 individuals) moved outside of the release area after the pen was removed (distance moved from release site: 1–16 m) compared to 67% (six of nine geckos) of the unpenned geckos (distance moved from release site: 4–39 m). Fourteen months after release, four females (all gravid) were found at the penned site and two (neither gravid) were found at the unpenned site. Forty-two geckos were translocated to Orokonui Ecosanctuary in December 2011 and January 2012 (21 females, six males and 15 unsexed juveniles) and held in a release pen (10–15 m wide, 55–60 m long and 0.5 m high) until September 2012, at which point the pen was removed. In September 2012, eleven individuals (six females, three males, two unsexed subadults) were released directly at a nearby site (200 m away). Ten penned and nine unpenned geckos were monitored by radio tracking (attached using a 22 x 3 cm self-adhesive fabric strip) one to two times daily for three weeks.

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

  2. Translocate reptiles away from threats: Snakes and lizards

    A replicated study in 2011–2012 in the Orokonui Valley, New Zealand (Knox & Monks 2014) found that some jewelled geckos Naultinus gemmeus translocated away from the threat of illegal collection survived for 14–24 months following release. At least 10 geckos survived for 10 months in a large holding pen following translocation. Fourteen-months after release from the holding pen or release directly into the wild, four penned females (all gravid) were found, and two direct release females (neither gravid) were found. Forty-two geckos were translocated to Orokonui Ecosanctuary from Otago Peninsula (where they were at risk of illegal collection) in December 2011 and January 2012 (21 females, six males and 15 unsexed juveniles) and held in a release pen (10–15 m wide, 55–60 m long and 0.5 m high) until September 2012, at which point the pen was removed. In September 2012, eleven individuals (six females, three males, two unsexed subadults) were released directly at a nearby site (200 m away). Ten penned and nine directly released geckos were monitored by radio tracking (attached using a 22 x 3 cm self-adhesive fabric strip) 1–2 times daily for three weeks.

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

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