Study

Monitoring the performance of wild-born and introduced lizards in a fragmented landscape: Implications for ex situ conservation programmes

  • Published source details Santos T., Pérez-Tris J., Carbonell R., Tellería J.L. & Díaz J.A. (2009) Monitoring the performance of wild-born and introduced lizards in a fragmented landscape: Implications for ex situ conservation programmes. Biological Conservation, 142, 2923-2930.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Snakes & lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Breed reptiles in captivity: Lizards

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Snakes & lizards

    A replicated, controlled study in 2001–2006 in two sites of forest fragments among cereal field in northern Spain (Santos et al. 2009) found that released captive-bred large psammodromus lizards Psammodromus algirus had similar survival compared to resident lizards, and a newly established population persisted for at least four years. Survival for a year after release was similar for released captive-bred lizards (2001–2002: 26 of 178, 15%; 2002–2003: 19 of 187, 10%) and residents (2002–2003: 4 of 30, 13%). A release site where only three native lizards were capture in 2002 still hosted a population in in 2006 (at least 6 individuals). More captive-bred lizards moved between habitat fragments (8 of 48 lizards) than did residents (2 of 112 lizards), though three other measures of movement and activity were similar between captive-bred and resident lizards (see paper for details). Captive-bred lizards were released in groups of 5–7 in two woodland fragments (0.9–5.2 ha) in each of two sites (located 8 km apart, two fragments/site). One site had a viable resident lizard population while the other did not. Released and resident lizards were monitored in spring and summer by walking around study sites and adjacent areas and noosing all detected lizards in 2002, 2003 (15 days each) and 2006 (two days). 

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

  2. Breed reptiles in captivity: Lizards

    A replicated study in 2001–2002 in a laboratory in northern Spain (Santos et al. 2009) found that large psammodromus lizards Psammodromus algirus bred successfully in captivity. Hatching success (2001: 92%; 2002: 87%) and hatchling survival (2001: 91%; 2002: 83%) were high in both years, yielding 178 and 187 juveniles for release in 2001 and 2002 respectively. Adult lizards (29 females and 15 males) were captured in 2001–2002 and housed in terraria (40 x 60 x 30 cm) with a soil substrate and a thermal gradient from 25–50°C. Eggs were placed in plastic cups with 35 g of moist vermiculite (10 g vermiculite: 8 g water) and incubated at 30°C. Hatchlings were placed in a nursery terrarium away from adults. Adults were re-released at their point of capture. Hatchlings were raised for around 49 days in 2001 and 66 days in 2002 before being released in to the wild.

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

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