Study

Growth and viability of a translocated population of alligator snapping turtles (Macrochelys temminckii)

  • Published source details Moore D.B., Ligon D.B., Fillmore B.M. & Fox S.E. (2013) Growth and viability of a translocated population of alligator snapping turtles (Macrochelys temminckii). Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 8, 141-148.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred reptiles into the wild: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A controlled study in 2007–2008 along a river in southern Oklahoma, USA (Moore et al. 2013; same experimental set-up as Moore et al. 2014) found that some captive-bred alligator snapping turtles Macrochelys temminckii released into the wild were recaptured in the year following release. Following release of 16 juveniles, individuals were recaptured on 5 occasions in the year of release and on 18 occasions the year after release (number of individuals recaptured not given). Individuals from a group of translocated adults were recaptured on 50 occasions (249 released, number of individuals not given). Released juveniles grew at a similar rate to those that remained in captivity (released: 0.07 mm/day, captive: 0.09 mm/day), but obtained higher body condition (data reported as statistical model result). Sixteen captive-bred juveniles were release at one location in June 2007, and a further 26 juveniles remained in captivity. An additional 249 adult turtles were confiscated from a turtle farm and released in groups of 27–62 at seven pools adjacent to the river in April 2007. Turtles were recaptured with baited hoop nets in May–August 2007 and 2008.

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

  2. Translocate adult or juvenile reptiles: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A replicated study in 2007–2008 along a river in southern Oklahoma, USA (Moore et al. 2013) found that most translocated alligator snapping turtles Macrochelys temminckii were not recaptured in the year following release. In the year of release adults were captured on 46 occasions (249 released) and one year following release adults were captured on 3 occasions. In comparison, individuals from a cohort of captive-bred juveniles were recaptured on 5 occasions (16 released) in the year of release and on 18 occasions the year after release (number of individuals not given). Seven turtles were confirmed to have died following release. Eight predated nests were found in 2007, seventeen in 2008, and one intact nest was found in 2008. Adult turtles (249 individuals) were originally wild-caught and were confiscated from a turtle farm and released in groups of 27–62 at seven pools adjacent to the river in April 2007. An additional 16 captive-bred juveniles were release at one location in June 2007. Turtles were recaptured with baited hoop nets in May–August 2007 and 2008.

    (Summarised by: Maggie Watson, William Morgan)

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