Study

An integrated research, management and community conservation program for the Rere (Madagascar Big-headed turtle), Erymnochelys madagascariensis

  • Published source details Velosoa J., Woolaver L., Randriamahita ., Bekarany E., Randrianarimangason F., Mozavelo R., Garcia G. & Lewis R.E. (2013) An integrated research, management and community conservation program for the Rere (Madagascar Big-headed turtle), Erymnochelys madagascariensis. Chelonian Research Monographs, No 6 - Tur, 171-177.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Head-start wild-caught reptiles for release: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Breed reptiles in captivity: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Head-start wild-caught reptiles for release: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A replicated study in 1998–2011 at a lakeside in Ankarafantsika, Madagascar (Velosoa et al. 2013) found that around a third of released head-started Madagascar big-headed turtles Erymnochelys madagascariensis survived on year in the wild and less than half of the first-year survivors were still alive after three years. Of head-started Madagascar big-headed turtles released in 2004, a total of 47 of 158 turtles (30%) survived one year, 32 of 158 turtles (20%) survived two years and 20 of 158 turtles (13%) survived three years in the wild. From 1998–2011, two hatchling Madagascar big-headed turtles were taken from each wild nest laid in a healthy population at Lake Antsilomba and raised in captivity for 1–7 years (280 nests and 410 hatchlings collected). Head-started turtles were released in 2004 (158 individuals, 3–5 years old) and 2009 (180 individuals, 1–7 years old) at Lake Ankomakoma. The population at Lake Ankomakoma was monitored twice a year after releases. Only results from the 2004 release were reported.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

  2. Breed reptiles in captivity: Tortoises, terrapins, side-necked & softshell turtles

    A study in 1999–2011 in a captive breeding facility in Ampijoroa, Madagascar (Velosoa et al 2013) reported that Madagascar big-headed turtles Erymnochelys madagascariensis bred in captivity. In total, 94 live hatchlings were produced in three different years (2 in 2004, 52 in 2008, and 40 in 2011). The authors reported that most of the eggs laid were infertile, and that all eggs laid in three nests in 2009–2010 were infertile. The captive breeding programme started in 1999 and from 2011, the captive population comprised six adult males and three adult females. Males and females were put together for the breeding season but kept separately for the rest of the year.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

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