Study

Selection of artificial refuge structures in the Australian skink, Egernia stokesii

  • Published source details Mensforth C.L. & Bull C.M. (2008) Selection of artificial refuge structures in the Australian skink, Egernia stokesii. Pacific Conservation Biology, 14, 63-68.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Create artificial refuges, hibernacula and aestivation sites

Action Link
Reptile Conservation
  1. Create artificial refuges, hibernacula and aestivation sites

    A replicated study in 2004–2005 in fenced sand and grass enclosures in South Australia, Australia (Mensforth & Bull 2008) found that gidgee skinks Egernia stokesii zellingi preferred artificial refuge structures with more crevices than those with fewer. Skinks spent more time on artificial refuge structures with more crevices (41 minutes/skink) than on those with fewer crevices (16 minutes/skink). Skinks spent more time taking refuge in the crevices of artificial refuges with more crevices (25 minutes/skink) than in those with fewer crevices (5 minutes/skink). Artificial refugia were created from 3 cm thick concrete slabs (40 x 40 cm or 60 x 60 cm) and placed in four outside pens (3 x 1.4 m) with a sand and grass substrate. For each trial, two refugia were provided at each end of the pen (60 cm apart). Each refuge had a base (1.2 x 1.2 m) made of four slabs. One, four or eight crevices were added to each structure using timber or slabs (see original paper for details). Skinks used in the trials were from a captive colony. Skinks were individually marked with paint prior to being placed in a pen (1 or 4 individuals at a time) and left undisturbed for 20 minutes. Skink behaviour was monitored by video camera for the following 60 minutes. Thirty trials were carried out in September 2004–March 2005.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 19

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust