Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Physically remove invasive or problematic species We found no studies that evaluated the effects of physically removing invasive or other problematic species on marine and freshwater mammal populations. ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2851https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2851Mon, 08 Feb 2021 10:58:53 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use biological control to manage invasive or problematic species We found no studies that evaluated the effects of using biological control to manage invasive or problematic species on marine and freshwater mammal populations. ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2852https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2852Mon, 08 Feb 2021 10:59:49 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Limit, cease or prohibit ballast water exchange in specific areas We found no studies that evaluated the effects of limiting, ceasing or prohibiting ballast water exchange in specific areas on marine and freshwater mammal populations. ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2853https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2853Mon, 08 Feb 2021 11:00:40 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Treat ballast water before release We found no studies that evaluated the effects of treating ballast water before release, on marine and freshwater mammal populations. ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2854https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2854Mon, 08 Feb 2021 11:01:49 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use deterrents to reduce predation on marine and freshwater mammals by native species One study evaluated the effects of using deterrents to reduce predation by native species on marine mammals. The study was in the North Pacific Ocean (USA). COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Survival (1 study): One controlled study in the North Pacific Ocean found that neither boat motor sounds nor the presence of humans reduced Galapagos shark predation on Hawaiian monk seal pups, although shark presence was low throughout the study. BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES)Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2855https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2855Mon, 08 Feb 2021 11:09:15 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use baited lines instead of nets for shark control Two studies evaluated the effects on marine mammals of using baited lines instead of nets for shark control. One study was in the Indian Ocean (South Africa) and one in the South Pacific Ocean (Australia). COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES) POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY) Survival (1 study): One site comparison study in the South Pacific Ocean found that using baited lines instead of nets increased the survival of entangled common and bottlenose dolphins. BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES) OTHER (2 STUDIES) Reduction in entanglements/unwanted catch (2 studies): Two site comparison studies in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean found that baited lines used for shark control had fewer entanglements of dolphins, whales and dugongs than nets. Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2856https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2856Mon, 08 Feb 2021 11:13:28 +0000Collected Evidence: Collected Evidence: Use biocides or other chemicals to control invasive or problematic species We found no studies that evaluated the effects of using biocides or other chemicals to control invasive or problematic species on marine and freshwater mammal populations. ‘We found no studies’ means that we have not yet found any studies that have directly evaluated this action during our systematic journal and report searches. Therefore we have been unable to assess whether or not the action is effective or has any harmful impacts. Please get in touch if you know of such a study for this action.Collected Evidencehttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2937https%3A%2F%2Fwww.conservationevidence.com%2Factions%2F2937Tue, 09 Feb 2021 17:48:47 +0000
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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