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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Install traffic calming structures to reduce speeds Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Key messages

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  • One study evaluated the effects on mammals of installing traffic calming structures to reduce speeds. This study was in Australia.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Abundance (1 study): A before-and-after study in Australia found that following installation of barriers to create a single lane, rumble strips, reflective wildlife signs, reflective wildlife deterrents, wildlife escape ramps and production of an educational pamphlet, a small population of eastern quoll population re-established in the area.
  • Survival (1 study): A before-and-after study in Australia found that following installation of barriers to create a single lane, rumble strips, reflective wildlife signs, reflective wildlife deterrents, wildlife escape ramps and production of an educational pamphlet, vehicle collisions with Tasmanian devils, but not eastern quolls decreased.

BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES)

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A before-and-after study in 1990–1998 in Tasmania, Australia (Jones 2000) found that following installation of barriers to create a single lane, rumble strips, reflective wildlife signs, reflective wildlife deterrents, wildlife escape ramps and publication of an educational pamphlet, an eastern quoll Dasyurus viverrinus population partially re-established and vehicle collisions with Tasmanian devils Sarcophilus laniarius, but not eastern quolls, decreased. Results were not tested for statistical significance. Following local extinction, 3–4 quolls re-colonised within six months of installation, increasing to ≥8 animals after two years. Road-kills were similar for quolls before and after implementation (1.6 vs 1.5/year), but decreased for Tasmanian devils (3.6 vs 1.5/year). Vehicle speeds declined by 20 km/h (17–35% reduction) at the site centre and by 3–7% at edges. Following road widening in 1991, vehicle-wildlife collisions increased and quolls became locally extinct (from 19 animals). In 1996, four ‘slow points’ (barriers, creating a single give-way lane, rumble strips and four other interventions) were created. Animals were surveyed using 60 cage traps for three nights in alternate months in October 1990–April 1993. Then, 10–20 traps were set for 20–100 trap nights in each April, May and July of 1995–1998. Spotlight counts were made once or twice in 1991, 1995, 1996 and 1998. Road-kills were recorded in 1990–1996. Vehicle speeds were recorded at four locations.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.