Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Modify traps used in the control/eradication of non-native species to avoid injury of non-target mammal Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Key messages

Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing

  • One study evaluated the effects of modifying traps used in the control or eradication of non-native species to avoid injury of non-target mammals. This study was in the USA.

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Condition (1 study): A before-and-after study in the USA found that modifying traps used for catching non-native mammals reduced moderate but not severe injuries among incidentally captured San Nicolas Island foxes.

BEHAVIOUR (0 STUDIES)

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A before-and-after study in 2006–2010 on an offshore island in California, USA (Jolley et al. 2012) found that modifying traps used to control non-native cats Felis catus reduced moderate but not severe injuries among San Nicolas Island foxes Urocyon littoralis dickeyi. These results were not tested for statistical significance. A lower proportion of San Nicolas Island foxes that were caught in modified traps (4%) suffered moderate injuries than when unmodified traps were used (25%). However, the rates of severe and very severe injuries in San Nicolas Island foxes were similar (around 5%) between the periods when modified and unmodified traps were used. The study was conducted on a 5,896-ha island. During 20 days in 2006, sixty-four San Nicolas Island foxes were caught with leg-hold traps deployed to catch non-native cats. Between June 2009 and January 2010, using modified leg-hold traps, 1,011 Nicolas Island foxes were caught. Trap modifications included a shorter anchor cable and chain, lighter spring, and additional swivels to allow unrestricted rotation of the trapped animal. Traps were checked remotely 24 hours a day to reduce the time foxes spent in the traps.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Littlewood, N.A., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K., Martin, P.A., Lockhart, S.L., Schoonover, R.F., Wilman, E., Bladon, A.J., Sainsbury, K.A., Pimm S. and Sutherland, W.J. (2020) Terrestrial Mammal Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions for terrestrial mammals excluding bats and primates. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.