Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Establish community-based fisheries management Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

Key messages

Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing

  • One study examined the effects of establishing community-based fisheries management on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the Foveaux Straight (New Zealand).

 

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Mollusc abundance (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the Foveaux Straight found that a customary fisheries area where management was community-based had more New Zealand scallops compared to a protected area prohibiting all fishing and an area allowing recreational harvest.
  • Mollusc condition (1 study): One replicated, site comparison study in the Foveaux Straight found that a customary fisheries area where management was community-based, tended to have smaller New Zealand scallops compared to a protected area prohibiting all fishing and an area allowing recreational harvest.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A replicated, site comparison study in 2013 of 20 sites in the Paterson Inlet, Foveaux Straight, New Zealand (Twist et al. 2016) found that sites within a customary fisheries area where management was community-based had more New Zealand scallops Pecten novaezealandiae, but they tended to be smaller, compared to adjacent sites in a marine protected area prohibiting all fishing (no-take reserve) and a recreational harvest-only area. Scallop abundance was higher inside the customary fisheries area (3.62 scallops/m2) compared to the other sites (no-take: 0.63 scallops/m2; recreational: 0.56 scallops/m2). Scallops tended to be smaller in the customary fisheries area (104 mm), compared to the no-take reserve (110 mm), and the recreational area (132 mm; size data were not statistically tested). In June 2013, divers counted and measured scallops in three to nine transects (100 m2) at each of 20 sites: six in the customary fisheries area (community-based management, see paper for details), three in the no-take reserve (designated in 2004), and three in the recreational harvest-only area.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Lemasson, A.J., Pettit, L.R., Smith, R.K., and Sutherland, W.J. (2019) Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.