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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Use different bait species in traps Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

Key messages

Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing

  • One study examined the effects of using different bait species in traps on subtidal benthic invertebrates. The study took place in the South Pacific Ocean (New Zealand).

 

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, controlled study in the South Pacific Ocean found that the type of bait used in fishing pots did not change the amount of unwanted invertebrates caught.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A replicated, controlled study in 2014–2015 in two seabed areas in the South Pacific Ocean, New Zealand (Major et al. 2017) found that the type of bait used in the New Zealand scampi Metanephros challengeri pot fishery did not change the amount of unwanted invertebrates caught, in either area. The amount of unwanted invertebrates caught was similar in pots baited with mackerel Scomber australasicus, barracouta Thyrsites atun, or squid Nototodarus sloanii (abundance data not shown). In two areas, three bait species were tested: mackerel vs squid, and barracouta vs squid (mackerel vs barracouta not tested). At Chatham Rise from November–December 2014, traps baited with either mackerel or squid (equal number of traps) were tested during three deployments (three 500 m lines of 30 traps/deployment). At Cape Palliser in April 2015, traps baited with either barracouta or squid (equal number of traps) were tested during three deployments (one 500 m line of 30 traps/deployment). Traps were recovered after 18 hours, and unwanted invertebrate catch identified and counted.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Lemasson, A.J., Pettit, L.R., Smith, R.K., and Sutherland, W.J. (2019) Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.