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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Fit one or more mesh escape panels/windows to trawl nets and use a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation

Key messages

Read our guidance on Key messages before continuing

  • One study examined the effects of fitting one or more mesh escape panels to trawl nets and using a square mesh instead of a diamond mesh codend on subtidal benthic invertebrate populations. The study was in the English Channel (UK).

 

COMMUNITY RESPONSE (0 STUDIES)

POPULATION RESPONSE (1 STUDY)

  • Unwanted catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that trawl nets fitted with two large square mesh release panels and a square mesh codend caught fewer unwanted catch of non-commercial invertebrates compared to standard trawl nets.

OTHER (1 STUDY)

  • Commercial catch abundance (1 study): One replicated, paired, controlled study in the English Channel found that trawl nets fitted with two large square mesh release panels and a square mesh codend caught fewer commercial shellfish, and fewer but more valuable commercially important fish, compared to standard trawl nets.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A replicated, paired, controlled study in 2007 in two areas of the English Channel, southwest England, UK (Wade et al. 2009) found that fishing with a trawl net fitted with a square mesh codend and two large square mesh release panels (“bycatch reduction devices”) reduced the biomass of non-commercial unwanted invertebrate catch (discard) compared to a standard trawl. Across the two areas, the modified trawls caught 39–45% less invertebrate discard (349–730 kg) compared to the standard trawls (635–1,207 kg). However, they caught 22–82% fewer commercial shellfish (94–101 individuals), compared to standard trawls (120–570 individuals). The modified trawls also caught 22% less commercially important fish in one area, but those were worth more per kg than the fish caught in the standard trawls. Two designs of trawl nets were towed simultaneously: a modified beam trawl with an 80 mm square mesh codend and fitted with two large 200 mm square mesh release panels (one to release weed and one to release invertebrates), and the industry standard beam trawl with an 80 mm diamond mesh codend. Seven to nine tows/area were conducted in July–August 2007. The catch was sorted into commercially important species (target and non-target commercial catch) and discard species. Commercial organisms were counted, and discards were further sorted into benthic invertebrates and finfish and each were weighed.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Lemasson, A.J., Pettit, L.R., Smith, R.K., and Sutherland, W.J. (2019) Subtidal Benthic Invertebrate Conservation: Global Evidence for the Effects of Interventions. Synopses of Conservation Evidence Series. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.