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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Retain/create habitat corridors in farmed areas Peatland Conservation

Key messages

  • One study evaluated the effects on peatland vegetation, in habitat patches or within corridors, of retaining or creating habitat corridors in farmed areas.This study was in a tropical peat swamp.
  • Vegetation structure (1 study): One study in Indonesia found that a peat swamp forest corridor contained 5,819 trees/ha. This included 331 large trees/ha, 1,360 saplings/ha and 4,128 seedlings/ha.  
  • Overall plant richness/diversity (1 study): The same study recorded 18–29 tree species in the peat swamp forest corridor (the number of species depending on the size class).

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

A study in 2007 in a peat swamp forest corridor in Indonesia (Gunawan et al. 2007) reported that the corridor contained 5,819 trees/ha (of all sizes) and 18–29 species (depending on size class). There were 331 large trees/ha, 1,360 saplings/ha and 4,128 seedlings/ha. There were 27 different species of large tree, 18 species of sapling and 29 species of seedling (total number of species not reported). The study does not report comparable data for natural peat swamp forests. The tallest trees were 48 m high. In 2007, one 100 x 100 m plot was established in a forest corridor (100–500 m wide), retained for nature conservation within a red wattle Acacia crassicarpa plantation. The water table was approximately 1 m lower than in natural peat swamp forest. Trees at all life stages were counted, measured and identified: large trees (trunk diameter >10 cm) in the entire plot, saplings (diameter 5–10 cm) in twenty-five 5 x 5 m subplots, and seedlings (diameter <5 cm) in twenty-five 2 x 2 m subplots.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Taylor N.G., Grillas P. & Sutherland W.J. (2018) Peatland Conservation. Pages 329-392 in: W.J. Sutherland, L.V. Dicks, N. Ockendon, S.O. Petrovan & R.K. Smith (eds) What Works in Conservation 2018. Open Book Publishers, Cambridge, UK.