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Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Red-eared terrapin: Application of a biocide Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

Key messages

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  • One replicated, controlled laboratory study in the USA, found that application of glyphosate to the eggs of red-eared terrapins reduced hatching success to 73%, but only at the highest experimental concentration of glyphosate and a surface active agent.

 

Supporting evidence from individual studies

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A replicated, controlled laboratory study in 2005 in the USA (Sparling et al. 2006)found that application of glyphosate to the eggs of red-eared terrapins Trachemys scripta elegans reduced hatching success and the health of hatchlings, but only at the highest glyphosate concentration.  Hatching success at the highest concentration of 11,206 ppm wet weight of glyphosate in Glypro and 678 ppm of the surface active agent LI700 was 73%, compared to hatching success of 80-100% in the lower concentrations and the control. Hatchlings from eggs that had been exposed to the highest concentration of glyphosate and surface active agent also weighed less both at hatching and at the end of the holding period, compared to those from eggs that had been exposed to lower concentrations. Eggs of red-eared terrapins were exposed to single applications of glyphosate and surface active agent, ranging from 0 to 11,206 ppm wet weight of glyphosate in Glypro and 0 to 678 ppm of the surface active agent LI700.

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Aldridge, D., Ockendon, N., Rocha, R., Smith, R.K. & Sutherland, W.J. (2018) Some aspects of control of freshwater invasive species. Pages 525-558 in: W.J. Sutherland, L.V. Dicks, N. Ockendon, S.O. Petrovan & R.K. Smith (eds) What Works in Conservation 2018. Open Book Publishers, Cambridge, UK.