Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Assessing the effects of seasonal grazing on holm oak regeneration: Implications for the conservation of Mediterranean dehesas

Published source details

Carmona C.P., Azcárate F.M., Oteros-Rozas E., González J.A. & Peco B. (2013) Assessing the effects of seasonal grazing on holm oak regeneration: Implications for the conservation of Mediterranean dehesas. Biological conservation, 159, 240-247


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Shorten livestock grazing period or control grazing season in forests Forest Conservation

A replicated study in Mediterranean open woodland in Spain (Carmona et al. 2013) found that seasonal grazing increased the abundance and height of oak saplings compared to permanent grazing. Percentage cover of young oaks (seasonal grazing: 9%; permanent: <1%) and young oak height (seasonal: 80 cm; permanent: 40 cm), and density of young and old oak saplings (seasonal: 100-80 saplings/ha; permanent: 20 saplings/ha) were higher with seasonal than permanent grazing. Two to six sites were located in each of nine permanently grazed areas (grazed throughout the year) and nine areas grazed seasonally December to May. Each area was 20-480 ha and had been grazed in the ten years before treatment. Monitoring was in four 3 × 3 m plots in each site.