Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A barrier fence and culvert reduced road mortality of reptiles and amphibians at Lake Jackson, Florida, USA

Published source details

Aresco M.J. (2005) Mitigation measures to reduce highway mortality of turtles and other herpetofauna at a north Florida lake. Journal of Wildlife Management, 69, 549-560


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install barrier fencing along roads Amphibian Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2000–2003 of temporary fencing along a highway to a culvert by Lake Jackson, Florida, USA (Aresco 2005) found that 70% of amphibians and reptiles (not including turtles) were diverted from the highway towards the culvert. Twelve amphibian species were recorded along the barrier. Fences diverted 74% of the 1,088 upland and semi-aquatic amphibians and reptiles from the highway (at fence: 74%; dead on road: 26%). Twenty-two percent of the 299 aquatic animals were also diverted (alive at fence: 22%; dead at fence: 2%; dead on road: 76%). In particular, the fence diverted small frogs and toads. Some species were significantly underestimated. The temporary fence was installed along the highway to divert animals to a culvert in April 2000 (700 m; 0.4 m high) and September 2000 (600 m). Monitoring was undertaken 1–4 times/day by walking the fence and checking the road and culvert until November 2003.

Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings Amphibian Conservation

A study in 2000–2003 of a culvert under a highway by Lake Jackson, Florida, USA (Aresco 2005) found that at least three amphibian species used the culvert. Many leopard frog Rana sphenocephala, pig frog Rana grylio and American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana were observed moving through the culvert. In total, 12 amphibian species were recorded along the fence and road. A temporary fence was installed along the highway to divert animals to an existing metal drainage culvert in April 2000 (700 m; 0.4 m high) and September 2000 (600 m). Monitoring was undertaken 1–4 times daily by walking the fence and checking the road and culvert until November 2003.