Providing evidence to improve practice

Action: Aerobic training Sustainable Aquaculture

Key messages

  • A randomised, replicated, controlled study in Norway found higher survival rates in salmon exposed to infectious pancreatic necrosis if they had undergone aerobic training. Interval training was more effective than continuous training.

Supporting evidence from individual studies

1 

In 2011, a randomised, replicated, controlled study in Norway (Castro et al., 2011) found increased survival rates in salmon, Salmo salar, exposed to infectious pancreatic necrosis virus due to endurance training. Fish that had undergone aerobic interval training showed higher survival rates (74%) compared with those that had undergone aerobic continuous intensity training or the non-trained control group (64% and 61% survival, respectively). Mortalities began to occur 11 days after exposure and continued until the end of the 31 day experiment. 120 fish were split into the three treatment groups; control untrained fish swimming in tanks with a constant average water speed of 0.05 body lengths/second, continuous intensity training salmon exposed to a constant average water speed of 0.8 body lengths/second and interval trained fish exposed to an average speed of 0.8 body lengths/second for 16 hours per day (including 4 h light–12 h dark). After training, fish were maintained for 6 weeks at a constant average water speed of 0.05 body lengths/second before cohabitation with 60 salmon infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis. Mortality levels were recorded daily for 31 days.

 

Referenced papers

Please cite as:

Jones, A.C., Mead, A., Austen, M.C.V.  & Kaiser, M.J. (2013) Aquaculture: Evidence for the effects of interventions to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) as a case study. Bangor University